A case-control study of colorectal adenomatous polyps and consumption of foods containing partially hydrogenated oils

Auteur(s) :
Mckelvey W., Eichenberger-gilmore JM., Frankl HD., Greenland S., Haile RW., Lee ER., Longnecker MP.
Date :
Juin, 1999
Source(s) :
CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY, BIOMARKERS AND PREVENTION. #8:6 p519-524
Adresse :
MCKELVEY W,UNIV N CAROLINA,SCH PUBL HLTH DEPT ENVIRONM SCI & ENGN;CB 7400 ROSENAU HALL;CHAPEL HILL,NC 27599 USA.wmckelve@sph.unc.edu

Sommaire de l'article

The trans fatty acids produced by partially hydrogenating vegetable oils may cause colorectal neoplasia by interfering with cell membrane function or eicosanoid synthesis. This possibility provides a rationale for looking at the relation between colorectal adenomatous polyps and consumption of foods containing partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (PHVOs), A total of 516 cases and 551 controls who underwent screening sigmoidoscopy from 1991-1993 were recruited from a prepaid Los Angeles health plan. Subjects were interviewed and given a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. Food items containing PHVOs were divided into four groups characterized by principal ingredients and preparation methods: sweetened baked goods, candy bars, oils and condiments, and french fries and chips. After adjusting for age, sex, physical activity, body mass index, smoking, total energy, and red meat and vegetable intake, there was a positive association between polyps and sweetened baked goods [350+ versus <50 kcal/day (odds ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.5)]. No association was found with the other food groups after adjustment for dietary and nondietary covariates, Neither was total dietary trans fatty acid associated with adenomas after adjustment for sweetened baked goods and other covariates, These results do not support the hypothesis that eating foods containing PHVOs increases the risk of colorectal adenomas, but they are consistent with the hypothesis that foods high in fat and sugar and low in fiber and correlated micronutrients increase the risk of adenomas.

Source : Pubmed
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