A Posteriori Dietary Patterns Are Related to Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: Findings from a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Auteur(s) :
Mcevoy CT., Hunter SJ., Woodside JV., Young IS., Mckinley MC., Cardwell CR.
Date :
Juil, 2014
Source(s) :
J Acad Nutr Diet.. #114:11 p1759-1775
Adresse :
Centre for Public Health, Institute of Clinical Science B, Queen's University Belfast, Grosvenor Road, Belfast BT12 6BJ, UK, Public Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh Medical School, Teviot Place, Edinburgh EH8 9AG, UK and Public Health Agency for Northern Ireland, Linenhall Street, Belfast BT2 8BS, UK m.mckinley@qub.ac.uk

Sommaire de l'article

Our review and meta-analysis examined the association between a posteriori-derived dietary patterns (DPs) and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for articles published up to July 2012 and data were extracted by two independent reviewers. Overall, 19 cross-sectional, 12 prospective cohort, and two nested case-control studies were eligible for inclusion. Results from cross-sectional studies reported an inconsistent association between DPs and measures of insulin resistance and/or glucose abnormalities, or prevalence of type 2 diabetes. A meta-analysis was carried out on nine prospective cohort studies that had examined DPs derived by principle component/factor analysis and incidence of type 2 diabetes risk (totaling 309,430 participants and 16,644 incident cases). Multivariate-adjusted odds ratios were combined using a random-effects meta-analysis. Two broad DPs (Healthy/Prudent and Unhealthy/Western) were identified based on food factor loadings published in original studies. Pooled results indicated a 15% lower type 2 diabetes risk for those in the highest category of Healthy/Prudent pattern compared with those in the lowest category (95% CI 0.80 to 0.91; P<0.0001). Compared with the lowest category of Unhealthy/Western DP, those in the highest category had a 41% increased risk of type 2 diabetes (95% CI 1.32 to 1.52; P<0.0001). These results provide evidence that DPs are consistently associated with risk of type 2 diabetes even when other lifestyle factors are controlled for. Thus, greater adherence to a DP characterized by high intakes of fruit, vegetables, and complex carbohydrate and low intakes of refined carbohydrate, processed meat, and fried food may be one strategy that could have a positive influence on the global public health burden of type 2 diabetes.

Source : Pubmed
Retour