Adolescent Student Use of School-Based Salad Bars.

Auteur(s) :
O'malley K., Johnson CC., Harris DM., Mundorf AR., Andersen L., Myers L.
Date :
Oct, 2015
Source(s) :
The Journal of school health. #85:10 p722-7
Adresse :
Utah State University, Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services, Department of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, 7000 Old Main Hill, Logan, Utah, 84322. lori.andersen@usu.edu

Sommaire de l'article

BACKGROUND:
Childhood obesity continues to be a public health problem in the United States. Increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables (F/V) is one strategy for decreasing high consumption of energy-dense, high-fat foods, thereby improving weight status. Many Orleans Parish public schools were provided with salad bars (SBs) to augment school lunch with increased access to F/V. This study identified factors associated with student use of SBs.

METHODS:
Surveys examining SB use, demographics, food preference, nutrition knowledge, and social support were administered to students in the 7th to 12th grades (N = 702) in Orleans Parish (New Orleans, Louisiana). Generalized estimating equations, which incorporate clustering at the school level, helped to determine associations between independent variables and SB use.

RESULTS:
Sixty percent of participants were SB users. Non-African-American students were more likely to be SB users than African-American students (odds ratio [OR] = 2.35, confidence interval [CI]: 1.35-4.07) and students who had high preference for healthy food were more likely to use the SB than those who had low preference (OR = 2.41, CI: 1.44-4.01). Students who encouraged others to consume F/V were more likely to use the SB than those who did not (p = .015).

CONCLUSIONS:
Individual and interpersonal factors related to SB use can provide guidance in the development of school-based interventions to increase SB use and F/V consumption.

Source : Pubmed
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