An eHealth Intervention to Increase Physical Activity and Healthy Eating in Older Adult Cancer Survivors: Summative Evaluation Results.

Auteur(s) :
Shtaynberger J., Krebs P., McCabe M., Iocolano M., Williams K., Shuk E., Ostroff JS.
Date :
Mar, 2017
Source(s) :
JMIR cancer. #3:1 pe4
Adresse :
Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, United States. Paul.Krebs@nyumc.org

Sommaire de l'article

BACKGROUND
A healthy lifestyle is associated with improved quality of life among cancer survivors, yet adherence to health behavior recommendations is low.

OBJECTIVE
This pilot trial developed and tested the feasibility of a tailored eHealth program to increase fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity among older, long-term cancer survivors.

METHODS
American Cancer Society (ACS) guidelines for cancer survivors were translated into an interactive, tailored health behavior program on the basis of Social Cognitive Theory. Patients (N=86) with a history of breast (n=83) or prostate cancer (n=3) and less than 5 years from active treatment were randomized 1:1 to receive either provider advice, brief counseling, and the eHealth program (intervention) or advice and counseling alone (control). Primary outcomes were self-reported fruit and vegetable intake and physical activity.

RESULTS
About half (52.7%, 86/163) of the eligible patients consented to participate. The most common refusal reasons were lack of perceived time for the study (32/163) and lack of interest in changing health behaviors (29/163). Furthermore, 72% (23/32) of the intervention group reported using the program and most would recommend it to others (56%, 14/25). Qualitative results indicated that the intervention was highly acceptable for survivors. For behavioral outcomes, the intervention group reported increased fruit and vegetable consumption. Self-reported physical activity declined in both groups.

CONCLUSIONS
The brief intervention showed promising results for increasing fruit and vegetable intake. Results and participant feedback suggest that providing the intervention in a mobile format with greater frequency of contact and more indepth information would strengthen treatment effects.

Source : Pubmed
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