An evidence-based conceptual framework of healthy cooking.

Auteur(s) :
Sharma SV., Strong LL., Durand C., Raber M., Chandra J., Upadhyaya M., Schick V.
Date :
Mai, 2016
Source(s) :
Preventive medicine reports. #4: p23-8
Adresse :
University of Texas, School of Public Health, Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, Houston, TX, United States; University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Pediatrics Research, Houston, TX, United States; University of Texas, School of Public Health, Division of Management, Policy and Community Health, Houston, TX, United States. Margaret.p.raber@uth.tmc.edu

Sommaire de l'article

Eating out of the home has been positively associated with body weight, obesity, and poor diet quality. While cooking at home has declined steadily over the last several decades, the benefits of home cooking have gained attention in recent years and many healthy cooking projects have emerged around the United States. The purpose of this study was to develop an evidence-based conceptual framework of healthy cooking behavior in relation to chronic disease prevention. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken using broad search terms. Studies analyzing the impact of cooking behaviors across a range of disciplines were included. Experts in the field reviewed the resulting constructs in a small focus group. The model was developed from the extant literature on the subject with 59 studies informing 5 individual constructs (frequency, techniques and methods, minimal usage, flavoring, and ingredient additions/replacements), further defined by a series of individual behaviors. Face validity of these constructs was supported by the focus group. A validated conceptual model is a significant step toward better understanding the relationship between cooking, disease and disease prevention and may serve as a base for future assessment tools and curricula.

Source : Pubmed
Retour