Barriers and Facilitators for Teachers’ Implementation of the Curricular Component of the Boost Intervention Targeting Adolescents’ Fruit and Vegetable Intake.

Auteur(s) :
Krølner RF., Due P., Aarestrup AK., Jørgensen ., Tjørnhøj-Thomsen ., Rasmussen MA.
Date :
Juil, 2014
Source(s) :
Journal of nutrition education and behavior. #46:5 pe1-8
Adresse :
Centre for Intervention Research in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: thsj@niph.dk

Sommaire de l'article

OBJECTIVE
To examine barriers and facilitators to teachers' implementation of the curricular component of the school-based, multicomponent Boost intervention to promote fruit and vegetable intake among 13-year-olds guided by concepts of Diffusion of Innovations Theory and findings of previous implementation studies.

DESIGN
Five focus group and 2 individual interviews.

SETTING
Denmark.

PARTICIPANTS
Twenty-two seventh-grade teachers from 7 of 20 intervention schools. Four schools (15 teachers) with a high implementation level and 3 (7 teachers) with a low implementation level were selected to obtain maximum variation in teachers' view.

PHENOMENON OF INTEREST
Teacher perceptions of implementation of a curricular component.

ANALYSIS
Situational Analysis including an introductory phase of systematic coding.

RESULTS
Teachers' commitment to the Boost curriculum was hindered by intervention duration and extra workload and motivated by a pre-intervention workshop and the thoroughness of the project. Detailed implementation manuals were helpful for some teachers but a barrier to others because they limited opportunities for adaptation.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS
Implementation of curricular activities in school-based interventions may be supported by a predefined teaching schedule, detailed teacher manuals, clear learning objectives, and a pre-intervention workshop to enhance motivation. Situational Analysis may contribute to future implementation studies by highlighting the importance of contextual factors.

Source : Pubmed
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