Changes in intake of fruits and vegetables in relation to risk of obesity and weight gain among middle-aged women.

Auteur(s) :
Willett WC., Hu FB., Manson JE., Colditz GA., Monbaliu S., Mitchell KS.
Date :
Déc, 2004
Source(s) :
INT J OBES RELAT METAB DISORD. #28:12 p1569-1574
Adresse :
Department of Preventive Medicine, The Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611-4402, USA. kahe@northwestern.edu

Sommaire de l'article

OBJECTIVE: To examine the changes in intake of fruits and vegetables in relation to risk of obesity and weight gain among middle-aged women. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study with 12 y of follow-up conducted in the Nurses’ Health Study. SUBJECTS: A total of 74,063 female nurses aged 38-63 y, who were free of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes at baseline in 1984. MEASUREMENTS: Dietary information was collected using a validated food frequency questionnaire, and body weight and height were self-reported. RESULTS: During the 12-y follow-up, participants tended to gain weight with aging, but those with the largest increase in fruit and vegetable intake had a 24% of lower risk of becoming obese (BMI> or =30 kg/m2) compared with those who had the largest decrease in intake after adjustment for age, physical activity, smoking, total energy intake, and other lifestyle variables (relative risk (RR), 0.76; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.69-0.86; P for trend or =25 kg), women with the largest increase in intake of fruits and vegetables had a 28% lower risk compared to those in the other extreme group (RR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.55-0.93; P=0.01). Similar results were observed for changes in intake of fruits and vegetables when analyzed separately. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that increasing intake of fruits and vegetables may reduce long-term risk of obesity and weight gain among middle-aged women.

Publication Types:
Multicenter Study

Source : Pubmed
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