Diabetes mellitus and serum carotenoids: findings of a population-based study in Queensland, Australia.

Auteur(s) :
Dobson AJ., Leonard D., Coyne T., Mcclintock C., Baade PD., Ibiebele TI., Dunne S., Shaw JE.
Date :
Sep, 2005
Source(s) :
Am J Clin Nutr.. #82:3 p685-693
Adresse :
School of Population Health, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. t.coyne@sph.uq.edu.au

Sommaire de l'article

BACKGROUND:
Epidemiologic evidence suggests that serum carotenoids are potent antioxidants and may play a protective role in the development of chronic diseases including cancers, cardiovascular disease, and inflammatory diseases. The role of these antioxidants in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus remains unclear.

OBJECTIVE:
This study examined data from a cross-sectional survey to investigate the association between serum carotenoids and type 2 diabetes.

DESIGN:
Study participants were adults aged > or = 25 y (n = 1597) from 6 randomly selected cities and towns in Queensland, Australia. Study examinations conducted between October and December 2000 included fasting plasma glucose, an oral-glucose-tolerance test, and measurement of the serum concentrations of 5 carotenoid compounds.

RESULTS:
Mean 2-h postload plasma glucose and fasting insulin concentrations decreased significantly with increasing quintiles of the 5 serum carotenoids–alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein/zeaxanthin, and lycopene. Geometric mean concentrations for all serum carotenoids decreased (all decreases were significant except that of lycopene) with declining glucose tolerance status. Beta-carotene had the greatest decrease, to geometric means of 0.59, 0.50, and 0.42 micromol/L in persons with normal glucose tolerance, impaired glucose metabolism, and type 2 diabetes, respectively (P < 0.01 for linear trend), after control for potential confounders.

CONCLUSIONS:
Serum carotenoids are inversely associated with type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose metabolism. Randomized trials of diets high in carotenoid-rich vegetables and fruit are needed to confirm these results and those from other observational studies. Such evidence would have very important implications for the prevention of diabetes.

Source : Pubmed
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