Dietary predictors of urinary environmental biomarkers in young girls, BCERP, 2004-7.

Auteur(s) :
Calafat AM., Mervish N., McGovern KJ., Teitelbaum SL., Pinney SM., Windham GC., Biro FM., Kushi LH., Silva MJ., Ye X., Wolff MS.
Date :
Juin, 2014
Source(s) :
Environmental research. #133C: p12-19
Adresse :
Department of Preventive Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 1 Gustave L. Levy Place Box 1057, New York, NY 10029, USA. Electronic address: Nancy.Mervish@mssm.edu

Sommaire de l'article

BACKGROUND:

Exposures of children to phthalates, parabens, and bisphenol-A (BPA) are of concern because of their hormonal potential. These agents are found in a wide range of foods and packaging. We investigated whether intake of certain foods predict exposures to these chemicals in young girls.

METHODS:

Among 1101 girls (6-8 years at enrollment) from the Breast Cancer and Environment Research Program (BCERP) study, we measured urinary exposure biomarkers for phthalates, parabens, and BPA and assessed dietary intake using 24-h recall 2-4 times. We examined the average daily servings of major and minor food groups categorized as 0 to <0.5, 0.5 to <1 and ≥1 servings per day. Items included dairy, eggs, fats, fish, fruit, single grains, meat, non-poultry meats, pasta, poultry and vegetables. Covariate-adjusted least squares geometric means and 95% confidence intervals of creatinine-corrected phthalate and phenol metabolite concentrations in urine were calculated in relation to food intake.

RESULTS:

Grains, flour and dry mixes and total fish consumption were positively associated with BPA and the sum of four di-2-ethylhexylphthalate (DEHP) urinary metabolite concentrations. Non-fresh vegetables and poultry were both positively associated with BPA and paraben urinary concentrations. Fats, oils and poultry consumption were positively associated with BPA. Whole-fat dairy consumption was associated with ΣDEHP.

CONCLUSIONS:

Some foods may contribute to child exposures to certain chemicals, and this may constitute modifiable means to reduce these environmental exposures.

Source : Pubmed
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