Effects of a fruit-vegetable dietary pattern on oxidative stress and genetic damage in coke oven workers: a cross-sectional study.

Auteur(s) :
Xie Z., Lin H., Fang R., Shen W., Li S., Chen B.
Date :
Mai, 2015
Source(s) :
Environmental health : a global access science source. #14:1 p40
Adresse :
School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing, 100191, P. R. China. xiezheng@bjmu.edu.cn.

Sommaire de l'article

BACKGROUND
Coke oven workers (COWs) are exposed to high level of genotoxic chemicals that induce oxidative stress and genetic damage. The dietary intake of certain types of foods may reverse these effects.

METHODS
We conducted a cross-sectional study with 51 topside COWs, 79 other COWs, and 67 controls, to assess the effects of dietary patterns on oxidative stress and genetic damage.

RESULTS
Compared to the controls, both topside and other COWs had significantly higher urinary 1-hydroxypyrene levels, serum oxidant levels [malondialdehyde, (MDA)], and genetic damage [micronucleus (MN) frequency & 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG)], but lower antioxidant levels [superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase, (GPx)]. The fruit-vegetable (FV) dietary pattern was positively correlated with serum SOD levels and negative correlated with serum MDA, MN frequency, and urinary 8-OH-dG. COWs with an FV patter in the highest quartile (Q4) had significantly increased antioxidant levels (SOD and GPx) and decreased oxidant levels (MDA) and genetic damage (MN frequency and 8-OH-dG) than those with an FV pattern in the lowest quartile (Q1).

CONCLUSION
Compared to control subjects, COWs had increased oxidative stress and genetic damage. A FV dietary pattern may reverse oxidative stress and genetic damage in COWs.

Source : Pubmed
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