Farmers’ market use among african-american women participating in the special supplemental nutrition program for women, infants, and children.

Auteur(s) :
Racine EF., Smith Vaughn A., Laditka SB.
Date :
Mar, 2010
Source(s) :
J AM DIET ASSOC.. #110:3 p441-6
Adresse :
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223-0001, USA. efracine@uncc.edu Comment in: J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Mar;110(3):364-5.

Sommaire de l'article

This quasi-experimental pilot study explored farmers’ market use among Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) participants and the effects of previous Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participation on farmers’ market use. African-American women who were pregnant and enrolling in WIC in Washington, DC (n=71), and Charlotte, NC (n=108), participated in the study. Surveys were completed in May and June 2007 measuring farmers’ market use, barriers to farmers’ market use, previous Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participation, previous redemption of Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program vouchers, and dietary consumption. Women in Washington, DC, might have previously participated in the Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program, while women in Charlotte had no previous Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participation. Analyses included descriptive, chi2 statistic, analysis of variance, and unadjusted and multiple logistic regression. Participants’ average age was 24 years, average education was 12.2 years, and average daily fruit/vegetable consumption was 7.5 servings. Participants in Charlotte and Washington, DC, without previous Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participation had similar farmers’ market use rates (32.4% and 40%, respectively); those with previous Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participation in Washington, DC, had higher farmers’ market use rates (61%) (P=0.006). Previous participation in the Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program (odds ratio [OR]: 3.30; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.57 to 6.93), previous redemption of Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program vouchers (OR: 4.96; CI: 2.15 to 11.45), and higher fruit/vegetable consumption (OR: 2.59; CI: 1.31 to 5.12) were associated with farmers’ market use. Controlling for city, women who previously redeemed Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program vouchers were more likely to use a farmers’ market (OR: 6.90; CI: 1.54 to 31.00). Commonly reported barriers were lack of farmers’ markets close to home and lack of transportation to farmers’ markets. Women who received and redeemed Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program vouchers were much more likely to purchase fruits/vegetables at farmers’ markets. Future research to explore barriers and incentives for farmers’ market use among WIC participants in urban and rural settings is warranted.

Source : Pubmed
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