Fruit and Vegetable Preferences and Identification by Kindergarteners through 2nd-Graders With or Without the US Department of Agriculture Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program.

Auteur(s) :
Johnson SL., Masis N., McCaffrey J., Chapman-Novakofski KM.
Date :
Oct, 2017
Source(s) :
Journal of nutrition education and behavior. #49:9 p752-758.e1
Adresse :
Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL. Electronic address: masis2@illinois.edu.

Sommaire de l'article

OBJECTIVE
The US Department of Agriculture Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP) allows schools to increase fruit and vegetable (FV) exposure by distributing FV as snacks. The objective of this study was to compare kindergarten through second (K-2nd)-graders who were exposed or not to FFVP for preferences and identification.

DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS
The FV Preference Survey for K-2nd-graders contained 12 fruits and 12 vegetables, a 3-Likert scale (liked it, okay, don't like it), and an I don't know option. Data were collected from K-2nd-graders at 2 elementary schools near Chicago, IL (n = 435, FFVP school, n = 235 with 12 teachers; non-FFVP school, n = 200 with 10 teachers).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S)
Mean preference scores.

ANALYSIS
Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U, and multiple linear regression analyses compared school data (P < .05).

RESULTS
There were significant differences in mean preference scores, with higher fruit scores at the FFVP school (1.8 ± 0.6) than at the non-FFVP school (1.7 ± 0.6). In contrast, there was a higher vegetable score for the non-FFVP school (1.3 ± 0.9) than for the FFVP school (1.2 ± 0.9). The school variable had weak impact on fruit ranking (multivariate coefficient = 0.01; P < .05). For fruits and vegetables and combined, there were fewer I don't know responses in the FFVP (χ(2) = 149.080; P < .01).

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS
At the FFVP school, fewer I don't know responses suggested better FV identification. Non-FFVP students had higher vegetable preferences than did FFVP students. Tasting a variety of FV may help with identifying FV, but more research is needed to determine the impact on preferences.

Source : Pubmed
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