Genetic and environmental effects on glucosinolate content and chemoprotective potency of broccoli

Auteur(s) :
Fahey JW., Stephensen CB., Farnham MW., Wilson PE.
Date :
Fév, 2004
Source(s) :
PLANT BREEDING. #123:1 p60-65
Adresse :
Reprints: FARNHAM MW,ARS,USDA US VEGETABLE LAB;2700 SAVANNAH HWY; CHARLESTON SC 29414, USA. mfarnham@saa.ars.usda.gov

Sommaire de l'article

Broccoli is well recognized as a source of glucosinolates and their isothiocyanate breakdown products. Glucoraphanin is one of the most abundant glucosinolates present in broccoli and its cognate isothiocyanate is sulphoraphane, a potent inducer of mammalian detoxication (phase 2) enzyme activity and anti-cancer agent. This study was designed to measure: glucosinolate levels in broccoli florets from an array of genotypes grown in several environments; the elevation of a key phase 2 enzyme, quinone reductase, in mammalian cells exposed to floret extracts; and total broccoli head content. There were significant environmental and genotype-by-environment effects on levels of glucoraphanin and quinone reductase induction potential of broccoli heads; however, the effect of genotype was greater than that of environmental factors. The relative rankings among genotypes for glucoraphanin and quinone reductase induction potential changed, when expressed on a per head basis, rather than on a concentration basis. Correlations of trait means in one environment vs. means from a second were stronger for glucoraphanin and quinone reductase induction potential on a per head basis than on a fresh weight concentration basis. Results of this study indicate that development of a broccoli phenotype with a dense head and a high concentration of glucoraphanin to deliver maximum chemoprotective potential (high enzyme induction potential/glucoraphanin content) is a feasible goal.

Source : Pubmed
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