Insufficient sleep among elementary and middle school students is linked with elevated soda consumption and other unhealthy dietary behaviors.

Auteur(s) :
Davison KK., Taveras EM., Falbe J., Gortmaker SL., Land T., Franckle RL., Ganter C.
Date :
Mai, 2015
Source(s) :
Preventive medicine. #74: p36-41
Adresse :
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: rnf726@mail.harvard.edu

Sommaire de l'article

OBJECTIVE:

This study examines the extent to which insufficient sleep is associated with diet quality in students taking part in the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Project.

METHODS:

Data were collected in Fall 2012 for all 4th and 7th grade children enrolled in public schools in two Massachusetts communities. During annual body mass index (BMI) screening, students completed a survey that assessed diet, physical activity, screen time, and sleep. Of the 2456 enrolled students, 1870 (76%) had complete survey data. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine associations between sleep duration and dietary outcomes (vegetables, fruits, 100% juice, juice drinks, soda, sugar-sweetened beverages and water), accounting for clustering by school. Models were adjusted for community, grade, race/ethnicity, gender, television in the bedroom, screen time, and physical activity.

RESULTS:

In adjusted models, students who reported sleeping < 10 hours/day consumed soda more frequently (β = 0.11, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.20) and vegetables less frequently (β = -0.09, 95% CI: -0.18, -0.01) compared with students who reported ≥ 10 hours/day. No significant associations were observed between sleep duration and fruits, 100% juice, juice drinks or water.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this population, insufficient sleep duration was associated with more frequent soda and less frequent vegetable consumption. Longitudinal research is needed to further examine these relationships.

Source : Pubmed
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