Intervention leads to improvements in the nutrient profile of snacks served in afterschool programs: a group randomized controlled trial.

Auteur(s) :
Freedman DA., Beets MW., Moore JB., Ward DS., Weaver RG., Huberty J., Turner-McGrievy B.
Date :
Sep, 2016
Source(s) :
Translational behavioral medicine. #6:3 p329-38
Adresse :
Department of Exercise Science, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, 921 Assembly St., RM 131, Columbia, SC, 29208, USA. beets@mailbox.sc.edu

Sommaire de l'article

Widely adopted nutrition policies for afterschool programs (ASPs) focus on serving a fruit/vegetable daily and eliminating sugar-sweetened foods/beverages. The impact of these policies on the nutrient profile of snacks served is unclear. Evaluate changes in macro/micronutrient content of snacks served in ASPs. A 1-year group randomized controlled trial was conducted in 20 ASPs serving over 1700 elementary-age children. Intervention ASPs received a multistep adaptive framework intervention. Direct observation of snack served was collected and nutrient information determined using the USDA Nutrient Database, standardized to nutrients/100 kcal. By post-assessment, intervention ASPs reduced total kcal/snack served by 66 kcal (95CI -114 to -19 kcal) compared to control ASPs. Total fiber (+1.7 g/100 kcal), protein (+1.4 g/100 kcal), polyunsaturated fat (+1.2 g/100 kcal), phosphorous (+49.0 mg/100 kcal), potassium (+201.8 mg/100 kcal), and vitamin K (+21.5 μg/100 kcal) increased in intervention ASPs, while added sugars decreased (-5.0 g/100 kcal). Nutrition policies can lead to modest daily caloric reductions and improve select macro/micronutrients in snacks served. Long-term, these nutritional changes may contribute to healthy dietary habits.

Source : Pubmed
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