Long-term health and economic impact of preventing and reducing overweight and obesity in adolescence.

Auteur(s) :
Lee SH., Wang LY., Denniston M.
Date :
Mai, 2010
Source(s) :
J ADOLESC HEALTH. #46:5 p467-73
Adresse :
Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. lgw0@cdc.gov

Sommaire de l'article

PURPOSE: Using data from the 2000 National Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and estimates from published studies, this study projected the long-term health and economic impacts of preventing and reducing overweight and obesity in today’s adolescents. METHODS: We developed a body mass index progression model to project the impact of a 1% point reduction in both overweight and obese adolescents aged 16-17 years at present on the number of nonoverweight, overweight, and obese adults at age 40 years. We then estimated its impact on the lifetime medical costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) after age 40. Medical costs (in 2007 dollars) and QALYs were discounted to age 17 years. RESULTS: A 1% point reduction in both overweight and obese adolescents ages 16-17 years at present could reduce the number of obese adults by 52,821 in the future. As a result, lifetime medical care costs after age 40 years would decrease by $586 million and lifetime QALYs would increase by 47,138. In the worst case scenario, the 1% point reduction would lower medical costs by $463 million and increase QALYs by 34,394; in the best case scenario, it would reduce medical costs by $691 million and increase QALYs by 57,149. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity prevention in adolescents goes beyond its immediate benefits; it can also reduce medical costs and increase QALYs substantially in later life. Therefore, it is important to include long-term health and economic benefits when quantifying the impact of obesity prevention in adolescents. Published by Elsevier Inc.

Source : Pubmed
Retour