Nonresident parental influence on adolescent weight and weight-related behaviors: similar or different from resident parental influence?

Auteur(s) :
Berge JM., Neumark-Sztainer DR., Meyer C., MacLehose RF., Eisenberg ME.
Date :
Oct, 2014
Source(s) :
Int J Behav Nutr Act.. #11:1 p131
Adresse :
Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Minnesota Medical School, Phillips Wangensteen Building, 516 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA jberge@umn.edu

Sommaire de l'article

Background

Many parents do not live with, or have shared custody of, their adolescent children (i.e., nonresident parents). The degree of their influence on their children, as compared to parents who do live with their children the majority of the time (i.e. resident parents) has not been well-studied. The current study aimed to examine whether and how resident and nonresident parents’ weight and weight-related behaviors are correlated with adolescents’ weight and weight-related behaviors. Results will inform who may be important to include in adolescent obesity prevention interventions.

Methods

Data from two linked population-based studies, EAT 2010 and F-EAT, were used for cross-sectional analyses. Resident parents (n = 200; 80% females; mean age =41.8), nonresident parents (n =200; 70% male; mean age =43.1), and adolescents (n =200; 60% girls; mean age =14.2 years) were socioeconomically and racially/ethnically diverse. Multiple regression models were fit to investigate the association between resident and nonresident parents’ weight and weight-related behaviors and adolescents’ weight and weight-related behaviors.

Results

Both resident and nonresident parents’ BMI were significantly associated with adolescents’ BMI percentile. Additionally, resident parents’ sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and fruit and vegetable intake were significantly associated with adolescents’ sugar-sweetened beverage intake and fruit and vegetable intake (p < 0.05), respectively. Furthermore, the association between nonresident parent physical activity and adolescent physical activity was marginally significant (p = 0.067). Neither resident nor nonresident parents’ fast food consumption, breakfast frequency, or sedentary behaviors were significantly associated with adolescents’ same behaviors.

Conclusions

These preliminary findings suggest that resident and nonresident parents may have slightly different influences on their adolescent children’s weight-related behaviors. Longitudinal follow-up is needed to determine temporality of associations.

Source : Pubmed
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