Outcome Effectiveness of the Widely Adopted EFNEP Curriculum Eating Smart ∙ Being Active.

Auteur(s) :
Auld G., Baker S., Conway L., Dollahite JS., Lambea MC., McGirr K.
Date :
Sep, 2014
Source(s) :
J Nutr Educ Behav.. #47:1 p19-27
Adresse :
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. Electronic address: susan.baker@colostate.edu

Sommaire de l'article

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the effectiveness of the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) curriculum Eating Smart ∙ Being Active (ESBA).

DESIGN AND SETTING:

A quantitative, multi-state, nonequivalent comparison group pretest-posttest design was used to compare nutrition-related behavior changes in participants. ESBA was compared to previously used curricula for 3 different time periods in 5 states using the EFNEP evaluation tool.

PARTICIPANTS:

Adults enrolled in EFNEP who completed their entry and exit paperwork during any of the 3 time points.

INTERVENTION:

An 8-lesson adult curriculum based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and MyPlate.

ANALYSIS:

Analysis of variance and covariance (with pretests scores and demographic variables as covariates) were used to analyze data with significance at P ≤ .05.

RESULTS:

ESBA elicited a mean positive behavior change for food resource management (P < .01), food safety (P ≤ .001), nutrition (P < .001), and physical activity level in participating states (P ≤ .01). Compared with previous curricula, ESBA produced better mean outcomes in food resource management, nutrition, physical activity, and intakes of fruit and vegetables.

CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS:

ESBA is effective at eliciting positive nutrition-related behavior change. The results of this multi-state, practice-based approach suggest that ESBA is effective in multiple settings and has external validity for use in EFNEP and other community nutrition programs.

Source : Pubmed
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