Response of vitamin K status to different intakes and sources of phylloquinone-rich foods: comparison of younger and older adults

Auteur(s) :
Booth SL., Dallal GE., Davidson KW., Gundberg CM.
Date :
Sep, 1999
Source(s) :
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION. #70:3 p368-377
Adresse :
Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111, USA. SBooth@HNRC.Tufts.edu

Sommaire de l'article

BACKGROUND: Phylloquinone, found in dark-green vegetables and certain plant oils, is the primary dietary source of the fat-soluble vitamin K. Limited data suggest that the relative bioavailability of phylloquinone from vegetables is lower than that from a supplement. This finding is relevant to the maintenance of optimal vitamin K status.

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare, in younger and older adults, the relative bioavailability of phylloquinone from a vegetable with that of a fortified oil.

DESIGN: In a crossover design with three 15-d residency periods in a metabolic unit, younger and older men and women (n = 36) consumed a mixed diet containing 100 microg phylloquinone/d. During 2 residency periods, the mixed diet was supplemented for 5 d with either broccoli (377 microg phylloquinone/d; broccoli diet) or phylloquinone-fortified oil (417 microg/d; oil diet). The relative bioavailability of phylloquinone was defined by the difference in plasma phylloquinone, percentage serum undercarboxylated osteocalcin (%ucOC), and urinary gamma-carboxyglutamic acid in response to 5 d of supplementation.

RESULTS: For both younger and older adults, plasma phylloquinone concentrations were higher (P < 0.001) and %ucOC values were lower (P = 0.001) after the broccoli and oil diets than after the mixed diet only. Overall, the response to broccoli supplementation was not significantly different from the response to the fortified oil in either age group. Urinary gamma-carboxyglutamic acid did not change in response to supplementation.

CONCLUSIONS: There was no significant difference in the relative bioavailability of phylloquinone, as evidenced by the lack of a significant difference in plasma phylloquinone and %ucOC between the 2 groups after either the broccoli or oil diets for younger and older adults"

Source : Pubmed
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