Serum concentrations of beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol are associated with diet, smoking, and general and central adiposity

Auteur(s) :
Gullberg B., Berglund G., Janzon L., Lahmann PH., Wallström P., Wirfält E.
Date :
Avr, 2001
Source(s) :
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION. #73:4 p777-785
Adresse :
"WALLSTROM P,UNIV LUND,MALMO DIET & CANC STUDY MED RES CTR MALMO UNIV HOSP,DEPT MED;SE-20502 MALMO, SWEDEN.peter.wallstrom@smi.mas.lu.se"

Sommaire de l'article

Background:
Previous studies of associations between diet, obesity, and blood concentrations of alpha -tocopherol and beta -carotene have been equivocal. Furthermore, most studies used only body mass index (BMI) as an obesity measure.

Objectives:
Our objectives were to examine the associations between energy and nutrient intakes, alcohol consumption, tobacco use, and serum cholesterol and serum concentrations of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene, and to examine the associations between different measures of general and central adiposity and serum concentrations of alpha -tocopherol and beta-carotene.

Design:
This was a cross-sectional, population-based study of 253 men and 276 women aged 46-67 y. Nutrient data were collected by a modified diet history method. Measures of obesity included BMI, percentage of body fat (impedance analysis), waist-to-hip ratio, and waist circumference. The associations between serum nutrient concentrations and the other factors were examined by multiple linear regression.

Results:
Twenty-one percent of men and 34% of women used antioxidant supplements. The mean BMI was 26.1 in men and 25.4 in women. Serum beta-carotene concentration was positively associated with serum cholesterol concentration, fiber intake, and beta-carotene intake, and negatively associated with smoking and all measures of obesity. In men, serum beta-carotene concentration was not significantly associated with central adiposity after adjustment for body fat. Serum alpha-tocopherol concentration was positively correlated with serum cholesterol, obesity, and vitamin E intake. In women, serum alpha-tocopherol concentration was also positively associated with intakes of ascorbic acid and selenium. Serum alpha-tocopherol concentration was associated with central adiposity after adjustment for body fat.

Conclusion:
Serum beta-carotene and alpha -tocopherol concentrations have different associations with diet, smoking, general adiposity, and central adiposity.

Source : Pubmed
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