Vegetable Intake, but Not Fruit Intake, Was Associated with a Reduction in the Risk of Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Middle-Aged Korean Men.

Auteur(s) :
Choi Y., Lee JE., Bae JM., Li ZM., Kim DH., Lee MS., Ahn YO., Shin MH.
Date :
Juin, 2015
Source(s) :
The Journal of nutrition. #145:6 p1249-55
Adresse :
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, Republic of Korea mhshin@skku.edu

Sommaire de l'article

BACKGROUND
Few prospective studies have examined the preventive role of fruit and vegetable intake against cancer in Asian populations.

OBJECTIVE
This prospective study evaluated the associations between total fruit intake, total vegetable intake, and total fruit and vegetable intake and total cancer incidence and mortality.

METHODS
This prospective cohort study included 14,198 men 40-59 y of age enrolled in the Seoul Male Cohort Study from 1991 to 1993. Fruit and vegetable intakes were assessed by a validated food-frequency questionnaire. We used Cox proportional hazard regression models to compute RR ratios and 95% CIs.

RESULTS
During the follow-up period from 1993 to 2008, 1343 men were diagnosed with cancer, and 507 died of cancer. Total vegetable intake was linearly associated with cancer incidence but was nonlinearly associated with cancer mortality; by comparing â?¥500 g/d with <100 g/d of total vegetable intake, the multivariable-adjusted RR for total cancer incidence was 0.72 (95% CI: 0.58, 0.90; P-trend: 0.02; P-nonlinearity: 0.06). For total cancer mortality, the multivariable-adjusted RRs comparing 100 to <200 g/d, 200 to <300 g/d, 300 to <500 g/d, and â?¥500 g/d with <100 g/d of total vegetable intake were 0.68 (95% CI: 0.53, 0.88), 0.75 (95% CI: 0.57, 0.98), 0.72 (95% CI: 0.54, 0.95), and 0.67 (95% CI: 0.47, 0.95), respectively (P-trend: 0.09; P-nonlinearity: 0.01). No associations were found between total fruit intake and total cancer incidence and mortality; â?¥300 g/d vs. <50 g/d, RR: 1.04 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.25; P-trend = 0.56) for incidence and RR: 0.89 (95% CI: 0.66, 1.21; P-trend = 0.71) for mortality.

CONCLUSIONS
Our finding suggests that total vegetable intake was linearly associated with cancer incidence but was nonlinearly associated with total cancer mortality. However, total fruit intake was not associated with total cancer incidence and mortality.

Source : Pubmed
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