A comparison of the socioeconomic characteristics, dietary practices, and health status of women food shoppers with different food price attitudes

Auteur(s) :
Bowman SA.
Date :
Juil, 2006
Source(s) :
NUTRITION RESEARCH. #26:7 p318-324
Adresse :
Addresses: Bowman SA (reprint author), USDA ARS, Beltsville Human Nutr Res Ctr, Beltsville, MD 20705 USA USDA ARS, Beltsville Human Nutr Res Ctr, Beltsville, MD 20705 USA E-mail Addresses: bowmans@ba.ars.usda.gov Publisher: PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND, http://www.elsevier.com

Sommaire de l'article

The aim of the study was to compare soicoeconomic, dietary, and health status of women food shoppers who considered food price very important (n = 1322) with those of women who did not consider food price very important (n = 1272). These women planned and prepared their household meals. Data from US Department of Agriculture's Diet and Health Knowledge Survey, 1994 to 1996, and Continuing Survey of Food Intake by Individuals, 1994 to 1996, were used. The socioeconomic characteristics, dietary intakes, fat reduction practices, and health status were estimated. A priori, pairwise mean comparisons, at alpha =.05 level of significance, were made. Food price was very important to 46.8% of women. More African-American and Hispanic women food shoppers were likely to consider food price very important when buying food. The women who considered food price very important were more likely to live in low-income, food-insecure households; receive food stamps; have low education; rent and not own homes; and be employed as service workers. They consumed 17 kJ less energy. Yet, the energy density of their diet was 11 kJ/kg more than that of the other group. They ate a low amount of relatively high-price foods like nonstarchy vegetables and drank more sweetened fruit dribs that are an inexpensive source of energy. A low percentage of them adopted dietary fat reduction strategies and read food labels. They are more likely to be overweight and have health conditions such as high blood pressure, heart disease, and diabetes than the others. Dietitians working with low-income food shoppers should address cost-effective ways to buy seasonally available fruits and vegetables and promote dietary fat reduction strategies.

Source : Pubmed
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