Glaucoma risk and the consumption of fruits and vegetables among older women in the study of osteoporotic fractures.

Auteur(s) :
Calatayud-Sáez FM., Stone KL., Coleman AL., Kodjebacheva G., Pedula KL.
Date :
Juin, 2008
Source(s) :
AM J OPHTHALMOL.. #145:6 p1081-9
Adresse :
Department of Ophthalmology and Jules Stein Eye Institute, University of California-Los Angeles, 100 Stein Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. colemana@ucla.edu

Sommaire de l'article

PURPOSE: To explore the association between the consumption of fruits and vegetables and the presence of glaucoma.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional cohort study.

METHODS: In a sample of 1,155 women located in multiple centers in the United States, glaucoma specialists diagnosed glaucoma in at least one eye by assessing optic nerve head photographs and 76-point suprathreshold screening visual fields. Consumption of fruits and vegetables was assessed using the Block Food Frequency Questionnaire. The relationship between selected fruit and vegetable consumption and glaucoma was investigated using adjusted logistic regression models.

RESULTS: Among 1,155 women, 95 (8.2%) were diagnosed with glaucoma. In adjusted analysis, the odds of glaucoma risk were decreased by 69% (odds ratio [OR], 0.31; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.11 to 0.91) in women who consumed at least one serving per month of green collards and kale compared with those who consumed fewer than one serving per month, by 64% (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.77) in women who consumed more than two servings per week of carrots compared with those who consumed fewer than one serving per week, and by 47% (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.29 to 0.97) in women who consumed at least one serving per week of canned or dried peaches compared with those who consumed fewer than one serving per month.

CONCLUSIONS: A higher intake of certain fruits and vegetables may be associated with a decreased risk of glaucoma. More studies are needed to investigate this relationship.

Source : Pubmed
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