Increasing Access to Fruits and Vegetables: Perspectives From the New York City Experience.

Auteur(s) :
Sacks R., Yi SS., Nonas C.
Date :
Mar, 2015
Source(s) :
American journal of public health. #105:5 pe29-37
Adresse :
At the time of study, all authors were with the Bureau of Chronic Disease Prevention and Tobacco Control, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Queens, NY. rachel.sacks.mph@gmail.com

Sommaire de l'article

Broad recognition now exists that price, availability, and other structural factors are meaningful barriers to fruit and vegetable consumption, particularly among low-income adults. Beginning in 2005, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene used the social-ecological model to develop a multifaceted effort to increase fruit and vegetable access citywide, with emphasis in low-income neighborhoods. Overall, the percentage of New York City adults who reported consuming no fruits and vegetables in the previous day decreased slightly over a 10-year period (2002: 14.3% [95% confidence interval = 13.4%, 15.2%]; 2012: 12.5% [95% confidence interval = 11.4%, 13.6%]; P for trend < .001). Our approach hypothesizes that complementary initiatives, implemented simultaneously, will create a citywide food environment that fuels changes in social norms and cultural preferences, increases consumer demand, and supports sustainable access to affordable produce.

Source : Pubmed
Retour