Mediterranean diet and hip fracture incidence among older adults: the CHANCES project.

Auteur(s) :
Trichopoulou A., Feskanich D., Orfanos P., Boffetta P., Benetou V., Michaëlsson K., Pettersson-Kymmer U., Byberg L., Eriksson S., Grodstein F., Wolk A., Jankovic N., de Groot LCPGM.
Date :
Avr, 2018
Source(s) :
Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA. # p
Adresse :
WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias street, 115 27, Athens, Greece. vbenetou@med.uoa.gr.

Sommaire de l'article

The association between adherence to Mediterranean diet (MD) and hip fracture incidence is not yet established. In a diverse population of elderly, increased adherence to MD was associated with lower hip fracture incidence. Except preventing major chronic diseases, adhering to MD might have additional benefits in lowering hip fracture risk.

INTRODUCTION
Hip fractures constitute a major public health problem among older adults. Latest evidence links adherence to Mediterranean diet (MD) with reduced hip fracture risk, but still more research is needed to elucidate this relationship. The potential association of adherence to MD with hip fracture incidence was explored among older adults.

METHODS
A total of 140,775 adults (116,176 women, 24,599 men) 60 years and older, from five cohorts from Europe and the USA, were followed-up for 1,896,219 person-years experiencing 5454 hip fractures. Diet was assessed at baseline by validated, cohort-specific, food-frequency questionnaires, and hip fractures were ascertained through patient registers or telephone interviews/questionnaires. Adherence to MD was evaluated by a scoring system on a 10-point scale modified to be applied also to non-Mediterranean populations. In order to evaluate the association between MD and hip fracture incidence, cohort-specific hazard ratios (HR), adjusted for potential confounders, were estimated using Cox proportional-hazards regression and pooled estimates were subsequently derived implementing random-effects meta-analysis.

RESULTS
A two-point increase in the score was associated with a significant 4% decrease in hip fracture risk (pooled adjusted HR 0.96; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.92-0.99, p

CONCLUSIONS
In this large sample of older adults from Europe and the USA, increased adherence to MD was associated with lower hip fracture incidence.

Source : Pubmed
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