Nutrient intake and dietary patterns in children 2.5-5 years of age with picky eating behaviours and low weight-for-height.

Auteur(s) :
Volger S., Zhang F., Sheng X., Tong LM., Zhao D., Fan T., Weisnagel SJ., Ho WM., Hays NP., Yao MP.
Date :
Jan, 2017
Source(s) :
Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition. #26:1 p104-109
Adresse :
Nestlé Nutrition, King of Prussia, PA, USA. Email: Sheri.volger@rd.nestle.com; sheri.volger@gmail.com.

Sommaire de l'article

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
Picky eating behaviours are common in young children and may adversely affect dietary intake. This study examined the adequacy of dietary patterns and nutrient intake in preschool-aged children in China and Hong Kong with picky eating behaviours and weight-for-height in the lowest quartile of the WHO Growth Standards.

METHODS AND STUDY DESIGN
Dietary intake was assessed using baseline 3-day food records from a multicenter, randomized trial in Chinese children (N=151) ages 2.5-5 years characterized as picky eaters by their parents and with weight-for-height <=25th percentile of the WHO Growth Standards. Nutrient intakes were calculated using validated dietary analysis software and compared with age-appropriate Chinese Recommended Nutrient Intakes (RNIs). Dietary patterns were compared with Hong Kong Food Pyramid recommendations.

RESULTS
Median daily energy intake was 25% lower than the age-appropriate RNI, while median intakes of calcium, iron, zinc, and vitamins C and E ranged from 52%-73% of the RNI. Vitamin D intake was only 37% of the RNI. Total fat and sodium intakes exceeded recommendations by 10% and 56%, respectively, while >16% of daily energy was derived from foods in the sweets/beverages/snack and the fats/oils groups. Almost 75% of the children met the recommended daily servings of meat/meat substitutes and nearly half met the recommendation for daily servings of fruit. Fewer met the recommendations for daily servings of vegetables (14.7%), milk/milk products (6.3%), and grains and cereals (6.3%).

CONCLUSIONS
Young children with picky eating behaviours and low weight-for-height had suboptimal dietary patterns and were at risk for significant dietary and nutrient insufficiencies.

Source : Pubmed
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