Relationship of climate and genotype to seasonal variation in the glucosinolate-myrosinase system. i. glucosinolate content in ten cultivars of brassica oleracea grown in fall and spring seasons

Auteur(s) :
Charron CS.
Date :
Août, 2021
Source(s) :
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Sommaire de l'article

Authors: Charron, CS; Saxton, AM; Sams, CE
Title: Source: JOURNAL OF THE SCIENCE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE, 85 (4): 671-681 MAR 2005
Keywords: glucosinolate; myrosinase; Brassica oleracea; isothiocyanate; glucoraphanin; sulforaphane; anticarcinogen; thioglucosidase; biofumigation
KeyWords Plus: VAR. ITALICA; VITRO ACTIVITY; NAPUS L; BROCCOLI; ARABIDOPSIS; INDUCTION; ENZYMES; ISOTHIOCYANATES; TEMPERATURE; VEGETABLES
Abstract:
Two cultivars each of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L var italica), Brussels sprouts (B oleracea var gemmifera), cabbage (B oleracea var capitata), cauliflower (B oleracea var botrytis) and kale (B oleracea var acephala) were grown during two fall seasons and two spring seasons to determine whether significant seasonal effects on glucosinolate (GS) concentrations could be explained by mean temperature, photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) and daylength during the growing seasons. Concentrations of total GSs, indole GSs and glucoraphanin differed by genotype and season. Total GS concentrations at harvest had a negative linear but positive quadratic relationship with temperature and daylength over the 2 weeks preceding harvest and a positive linear but negative quadratic relationship with PPF over the same 2 weeks. The regression model for indole GS concentrations similarly varied with mean temperature, daylength and PPF over the 4 weeks prior to harvest. Glucoraphanin concentrations at harvest decreased linearly with mean PPF from transplanting to harvest and had a negative linear but positive quadratic relationship with daylength from transplanting to harvest. Because glucoraphanin and other GSs in cruciferous crops are important for cancer chemoprotection, climatic conditions should be considered when planning planting dates or when making breeding selections for GS concentration. (C) 2004 Society of Chemical Industry.
Reprints: SAMS CE,UNIV TENNESSEE,DEPT PLANT SCI;RM 252 ELLINGTON PLANT SCI BLDG,2431 JOE JOHNSON; KNOXVILLE TN 37996, USA.
carlsams@utk.edu
Research
Institutions: Univ Tennessee, Dept Plant Sci, Knoxville, TN 37996 USA.
Univ Tennessee, Dept Anim Sci, Knoxville, TN 37996 USA.
Discipline: AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY

CC Editions / Collections: Agriculture, Biology & Environmental Sciences (ABES)

Source : Pubmed
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