Salad Bars Increased Selection and Decreased Consumption of Fruits and Vegetables 1 Month after Installation in Title I Elementary Schools: A Plate Waste Study.

Auteur(s) :
Bean MK., Brady Spalding B., Theriault E., Dransfield KB., Sova A., Dunne Stewart M.
Date :
Mar, 2018
Source(s) :
Journal of nutrition education and behavior. # p
Adresse :
Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Richmond at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA. Electronic address: mkbean@vcu.edu.

Sommaire de l'article

OBJECTIVE
To evaluate the 1-month impact of salad bars on fruit and vegetable (FV) selection, intake, and waste.

DESIGN
Pre-post quasi-experimental design.

SETTING
Title I elementary schools in a large, urban district in central Virginia.

PARTICIPANTS
Students (grades 1-5; >95% African American) from 2 elementary schools participated in plate waste assessments (282 plates were rated at baseline, 443 at post-assessment); fourth- and fifth-grade students from 15 (of 18 eligible) schools (n = 1,193) responded to surveys.

INTERVENTION
Digital imagery plate waste assessments were conducted before salad bars were installed (baseline) and 1 month afterward (post). Post-surveys examined student perceptions of salad bars.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES
Fruit and vegetable selection, consumption, and waste.

ANALYSIS
General linear models (without considering clustering) examined changes in outcomes, controlling for school. Frequencies and qualitative analyses were applied to survey data.

RESULTS
At post, students selected more types of FVs (1.81-2.58; P < .001), although FV consumption decreased by 0.65 cups (P < .001). Given the smaller portions selected, there was less FV waste (0.27 cups; P < .001) at post. Students liked the ability to choose FV from salad bars.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS
Short-term exposure to salad bars increased the number of FV students chose but decreased FV consumption. Additional strategies are needed to increase FV consumption.

Source : Pubmed
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